LAZARO ARTICLE ON INJURY

responsible for upright row induced injuries, one of which is:

Excessive weight on the bar
This is possibly the most dangerous technique fault. If the initial weight of the bar is too great, the lifter will initiate the movement by flexing at the hips/trunk and using some back extensor force.
The spine is forced into a degree of extension during the upward phase of the lift, compressing the lumbar spine joints.
 
Upright Row Injury:
 
The basic aim of the upright row is to lift a weight from the hips up to the chin and lower it back down. This is achieved by holding a barbell with a pronated (palms facing lifter) grip with the hands from 7.5cm-20cm apart.
The weight is lifted in line with the vertical axis of the body to the upper thorax/chin level and then down to the hips again.
The upright row involves multiple joints and are commonly used to develop shoulder strength and size, which means it can be used by body builders and athletes alike.
The Injury Risk:
The primary musculoskeletal area susceptible to injury from incorrect technique is the shoulder.
When the arm is abducted away from the body into the shoulder elevation, some amount of shoulder external rotation is also needed.
The biomechanical nature of the upright row makes it difficult to allow external rotation to occur, thereby making the exercise risky for the shoulders.
Incorrect lifting can also place serious pressure on the lumbar and cervical spine which can lead to long term complications.
technique faults which are responsible for upright row induced injuries, one of which is:
Excessive weight on the bar
This is possibly the most dangerous technique fault. If the initial weight of the bar is too great, the lifter will initiate the movement by flexing at the hips/trunk and using some back extensor force.
The spine is forced into a degree of extension during the upward phase of the lift, compressing the lumbar spine joints.
 
The Chin Up and Lateral Pulldown:
 
The chin up and lat pulldown belong to the group known as the 'vertical pull' exercises.
The basic goal of the lat pulldown is to pull a weight (in effect, a moving bar) from above the head down to the chin (or below it), and then control the weight back up again.
In the chin up, the goal is to hold a stationary bar and lift or pull the body up from a hanging position until the chin clears the bar. The chin up is considered one of the 'big two' when it comes to upper body exercises (the other being bench press).
The lat pulldown is a close cousin designed for those whose large body mass or inherent weakness in the associated muscles make a chin up unsuitable.
Chin ups have long been used as a physical performance test by the armed services, athletes and most male gym-goers.
The Injury Risk:
The primary musculoskeletal areas susceptible to injury from incorrect lifting technique are:
Shoulders
The primary concern is that the anterior shoulder structures (anterior labrum, ligaments and biceps tendons) can be 'overstretched' if the scapulae are allowed to tilt forward at the end/top of the lift (at the top of the chin up or when the bar is at chin level with pulldowns).
If the scapulae tilt forward at this point, the head of the humerus moves forward in relation to the glenoid and the anterior shoulder structures can be injured.
The risk here is if the cervical spine is allowed to extend during the lift, which would occur if the lifter is looking up or if the bar is pulled behind the head.
Lazaro almenares Personal trainer exercises nutrition specialist fitness expert presenter sky 281 the active channel.
www.cubancardio.com
 

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